Camera & End Zone System Recommendations

Technology

If you have been searching for recommendations to discover the best endzone camera to utilize with Hudl, the clear answer is surprisingly difficult to find. While there do be seemingly Hudl recommended endzone video cameras, there’s hardly any information available on the very best complete Hudl compatible endzone video systems with camcorder tower.

To help you choose the very best endzone camera system to utilize with Hudl, listed below are a few of reasons why we believe that the Hi Rise Camera system is one of the best choices of endzone cameras to utilize with Hudl.

The most effective vantage point
For most field sports, Hudl recommend that, while the siting of the camera at the endzone or the sideline may vary with various sports, the very best angles for just about any sport can be achieved from a higher vantage point. Hudl recommends finding an elevated position round the outside of the field play to take video from, but, as that is extremely hard at many locations, a telescopic camera tower will probably the very best option for most teams. The Hi Rise camera system features a telescoping camera tower that can be expanded up to 20 feet, that may provide the ideal high angle view of a game title that Hudle recommends, wherever your team plays.

Video clip in the home and away
Hudl is designed to be considered a coaching tool that may be used to analyze both games and practices, so you will need an endzone camera system that you can take with you, wherever you team are playing. The Hi Rise endzone video system is lightweight and easy to transport; the entire unit weighs only approximately 50lbs.

As it happens video monitoring
Another big advantageous asset of using Hudl is that, if you have a viewing monitor, then high angle video can offer you a major advantage within a game. With video obtained from a 20 foot high vantage point, you be will able to see how a game is unfolding and that will provide you with the main advantage of being able to anticipate the opposition’s next moves. The state-of-the-art 7-inch HDMI monitor that is given the Hi Rise endzone camcorder system will provide you with magnificent images of every game, because it happens.

Hudl Recommended camcorder
To obtain the crisp and clear images that you need to make Hudl really effective you will need a high quality camera together with your endzone video system. Hudl lists cameras recommend for use with the Hudl sports analysis tools and that list included the Sony HDR-CX405 camcorder, which can be the camera that is given the Hi rise endzone camera system. The Sony HDR-CX405 camcorder is world renowned for its simplicity of use, its fine quality images, and for its light weight. All of which makes the Sony HDR-CX405 an ideal camera to utilize as an endzone camera with Hudl.

While there may be other manufacturers of endzone tower video systems, such as for instance Hi pod and Sport Scope, we believe that the innovative design and the simple to use top features of the Hi Rise endzone camera solution ensure it is the very best Hudl ready endzone video system in the marketplace today.

Vibration Testing and Shock Testing Services

Technology

From sub-atomic particles all the way around skyscrapers, internal movements and motions resulting from the absorption of energy make all objects vibrate to some degree. This fact ensures that in a global full of energy and movement, vibrations — or the oscillating responses of objects when moved from a situation of rest — will be the norm.

Some vibrations are expected and even needed for products to work as expected. As a great example, consider traditional speakers that turn energy into vibrations, which ultimately allows music lovers to listen to a common singers and musicians. Another example may be the tightly stretched diaphragm contained in the chest bit of a stethoscope, which, when excited by sound waves, allows a physician to listen to a patient’s heartbeat and/or breathing.

Of course, not totally all objects vibrate in a way that’s helpful as well as intended. For example, there probably isn’t a civil engineer alive who doesn’t know the story of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and how 40-mile-per-hour winds induced its collapse because of structural labs for testing product vibration. As for the rest of us, we realize of the bridge’s final, fateful moments on November 7, 1940 thanks to the frequently viewed footage captured by camera store owner Barney Elliott. The film shows the bridge entering violent wavelike motion before breaking up and falling into Washington State’s Puget Sound below.

A more recent example of unintended vibration may be the now famous June 10, 2000 opening day of London’s Millennium Footbridge. The combined synchronous movements of pedestrians caused what’s known as positive feedback — a swaying motion emanating from the natural human instinct to stay balanced while walking. The result triggered Londoners dubbing the structure the “Wobbly Bridge.”

Fortunately for manufacturers and consumers alike, the materials and products we count on today in sets from airplane wings to suspension bridges are created stronger and more reliable thanks in large part to vibration testing labs.

From sub-atomic particles all the way around skyscrapers, internal movements and motions resulting from the absorption of energy make all objects vibrate to some degree. This fact ensures that in a global full of energy and movement, vibrations — or the oscillating responses of objects when moved from a situation of rest — will be the norm.

Some vibrations are expected and even needed for products to work as expected. As a great example, consider traditional speakers that turn energy into vibrations, which ultimately allows music lovers to listen to a common singers and musicians. Another example may be the tightly stretched diaphragm contained in the chest bit of a stethoscope, which, when excited by sound waves, allows a physician to listen to a patient’s heartbeat and/or breathing.

Of course, not totally all objects vibrate in a way that’s helpful as well as intended. For example, there probably isn’t a civil engineer alive who doesn’t know the story of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and how 40-mile-per-hour winds induced its collapse because of structural vibration. As for the rest of us, we realize of the bridge’s final, fateful moments on November 7, 1940 thanks to the frequently viewed footage captured by camera store owner Barney Elliott. The film shows the bridge entering violent wavelike motion before breaking up and falling into Washington State’s Puget Sound below.

A more recent example of unintended vibration may be the now famous June 10, 2000 opening day of London’s Millennium Footbridge. The combined synchronous movements of pedestrians caused what’s known as positive feedback — a swaying motion emanating from the natural human instinct to stay balanced while walking. The result triggered Londoners dubbing the structure the “Wobbly Bridge.”

Fortunately for manufacturers and consumers alike, the materials and products we count on today in sets from airplane wings to suspension bridges are created stronger and more reliable thanks in large part to testing laboratories.